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Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Berkley Estes

Berkley Estes

     Berkley Estes (1797-1869) was born at Greenfield plantation to Richard and Catherine Estes. Berkley was one of four sons and a brother to my great great grandmother, Nancy Estes Row. It is said that, while too young to participate in the fighting, Berkley served in the War of 1812 doing the jobs required in camp life. Like many of my Estes and Row ancestors, he was drawn west by opportunities he felt were superior to what were available in Spotsylvania. He first moved to Kentucky where he married a second cousin, Malinda Estes.
     Berkley and Malinda moved to Boone County, Missouri in the 1820s and established a farm just east of Columbia. His was one of the first brick houses built in the county and Berkley became a substantial landowner and slaveholder.  He was joined in Missouri by his brothers Ambrose and Richard; the fourth Estes brother, George Washington, settled in Kentucky. Richard Estes donated land and Berkley put up $300 to secure the location of the University of Missouri in Columbia. Malinda died in 1838 and Berkley married Mary Truitt a year later.
     After he died in 1869 Berkley's daughter Margaret Boulton wrote a letter to Nannie Row of Greenfield, describing in vivid detail the circumstances of his death. He is buried in the Estes cemetery in Boone County.

Margaret Boulton to Nannie Row 1869

Margaret Boulton to Nannie Row 1869

Margaret Boulton to Nannie Row 1869

Transcription of Margaret Boulton's letter

Transcription of Margaret Boulton's letter

From the Row family Bible

2 comments:

  1. Stumbled upon this excellent archive today while doing some "clean-up" genealogy research. We're very remotely related (reaching back to Abraham Estes, and splitting there - my family traveled to Maury County, Tennessee). Thanks for posting this! I wish more family tree researchers would post the same sort of documentation.

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  2. Thanks for your kind words. I am always pleased to hear from my Estes relatives, no matter how remote. Who was your Tennessee ancestor?

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